Generation Z is Joining the Workforce


The oldest Gen Z-ers (born from 1995 to 2009) turn 24 this year and are going to work. They are the first group of Americans who have known digital world all their lives. Many work-space managers say they don't think these people want to get along with them. Many employers say they are hard to work with and they can't seem to relate to co-workers. Corporate Coach Mark Fenner has some ideas to talk the managers off their corporate ledges. “They have tremendous strength in technology and understating social media and digital society." And he gives this helpful directive to their managers. “Their weaknesses are their people skills. Employers need to make an effort to get them some training to help equip them to fill in those blank spots.Put that generation through communication training and get them some people skills. They didn’t get a lot of that growing up.”

Fenner says they are young adults with a lot of passion --- and to give them some direction and training - and you'll grow to love them.

Click here for even more tips on "handling" Generation Z.


Sponsored Content

Sponsored Content