Senior citizens might make better hires than teens


When today’s seniors were teenagers, they had a lot of different work ethics that aren’t around today.

AARP and Bloomberg are reporting that McDonald’s has been recruiting at senior citizens centers and churches.

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics finds the number of working Americans between ages 65 and 74 is expected to increase 4.5 percent between 2014 and 2024, while the number of those between 16 to 24 is expected to drop 1.4 percent.

Culture Consulting Associates president and founder Joshua M. Evans said when today’s seniors were teenagers, they had a lot of different work ethics that aren’t around today.

"I think many of the older generations grew up in an environment where engagement and commitment to a role was an expectation. And nowadays, with the younger generations, it's become more of an aspiration," said Evans.

He said seniors make phenomenal hires because they're capable, loyal and knowledgeable, while not necessarily looking for the paycheck that matches the job they had before they retired.

"There's a level of professionalism and commitment that's often brought to these positions by senior citizens. So they have this intrinsic knowledge that a lot of younger generations don't have," said Evans.

Due to a labor shortage and Baby Boomers are staying in the workforce longer, places want to hire senior citizens.


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