Bad healthcare lowers Texas’ rank for places to retire

posted by iHeartMedia’s Audrey Morton - 

When it comes to perfect places to retire, Texas isn't even in the top 10.

Texas ties with Colorado as the 17th-best state to retire, according to a new Bankrate.com report.

BankRate.com's analyst Taylor Tepper said the study examined seven categories: cost of living, taxes, health care quality, weather, crime, cultural vitality and well-being.

Texas did particularly well in weather (#4), taxes (#13) and well-being (#13).

The main drawbacks were crime (#36), cultural vitality (#43) and health care quality (#44).

Tepper said by and large Texas, as a whole, didn't do well in healthcare.

“It all sort of depends on your local situation. So, in Houston, you may have the best access to world-renowned cancer and healthcare providers that someone in Lubbock may not,” said Tepper.

A significant other and nest egg are also factors for a good retirement. Tepper reminded people to make sure you're saving 15 percent of your pay now to hit 10 times earnings by age 65.

Also, those who were forced to leave their job or work fewer hours were less happy than those who had a say in the matter.

South Dakota is the best state to retire, followed by Utah, Idaho, New Hampshire and Florida.

“You need a sophisticated understanding of what will make you happy in retirement,” said Tepper. “Yes, South Dakotans enjoy a low tax burden, but they are also more satisfied with their lives than anyone else. They savor their day-to-day lives, feel financially secure and have a strong sense of community. Residents in the other top states feel similarly. These attributes may better determine what makes for a satisfying retirement than, say, warm weather.”

South Dakota, Utah, Idaho and New Hampshire were dinged for cold, snowy winters. Florida is extremely popular among retirees for its warm weather and low taxes.

The study found New York is the worst state to retire. The Empire State landed in the bottom 10 of three categories: cost of living (#50), taxes (#49) and health care quality (#41).

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