A new scam is aimed at stealing taxpayers' refunds by using data compromised in tax preparers' offices.

FYI...the IRS doesn't usually send e-mails.

Tax director Ken Leyhane says it's an extra step for tax preparers to checking routing and account numbers.

“Each preparer has to have some kind of an IT person that makes sure that each firewall is up to date. Then you have to check the bank account before you start to release it,” said Leyhane.

He said you need to ask your tax preparer you hire how your data is protected,

The taxpayer should ask their accountant, what steps does he or she take to ensure the safety of a client’s personal information? What tax preparation software they use? What security measures does the tax software have to prevent identity theft?

He said their tax preparation software requires passwords to get into the software and a different password to e-file and a capture code.

“You go to your CPA and the CPA says ok, we have to launch an inquiry as to where the refund is and then IRS is going to come back and say well, I refunded it to this and this account, and then you say that’s not my account,” said Leyhane.

Leyhane said then you need to dispute the IRS and may be resolved in six to eight months.