Even in flu season, please, sneeze


Researchers warn that hindering a sneeze can be dangerous.

A medical case study found that a man who tried to stop a sneeze ended up in the emergency room.

The air that comes out of a sneeze is about 150 miles per hour. Stopping a sneeze means you're basically swallowing the sneeze's explosive force.

Kelsey Seybold's Dr. Christine Le said there's been a few cases when holding in a sneeze has caused a collapsed lung.

“When people are sneezing, the whole point is to get something out of you—whether it’s viruses, bacteria, or a little bit of exposure to dust,” said Le.

She said it's unusual for someone to stop a sneeze.

“If you really have to sneeze, let it out. But, if possible, given that it’s flu season, please cover up, so at least you’re not getting the people around you sick,” said Le.

She said there's been a few cases when holding in a sneeze has caused a collapsed lung. It can also rupture your throat, burst an ear drum, or pop a blood vessel in your brain.


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